‘Miss America’ Dr Debbye Turner DVM – Famous Veterinarians around the World

Famous Veterinarians around the World – Debbye Turner

Debbye Turner is an American vet, a talk show hostess and winner of the 1990 Miss America contest. After graduation from college with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, she became a spokesperson for Purina and pursued a career in veterinary medicine before going into television. Turner’s first hosting job came at St. Louis’ NBC affiliate, KSDK, on a show called Show Me St. Louis in 1995. Six years later, Turner joined CBS News as a reporter and contributor on The Early Show, a position she still holds. Turner has been dubbed The Early Show‘s resident veterinarian, sharing a wealth of advice about quality pet care. In 2002, Debbye garnered an interview with President & Mrs. Bush at the White House for a Pet Planet segment about the first family’s pets.

Cow magnets – to prevent Hardware disease (TRP) in cattle

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A cow magnet is a veterinary medical device for the treatment or prevention of hardware disease in cattle.

Traditionally, cow magnets were strong alnico magnets about 1 cm by 8 cm (0.4 by 3.1 inches) in the shape of a smoothed rod, but today they are more commonly several ring-shaped ferrite magnets attached to a stainless-steel or plastic core, in the same shape as the single-piece original.

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Newer designs to help increase effectiveness include a cage design, in which the magnet holds metal objects inside a protective plastic framework. Even newer designs include a stronger array of rare-earth magnets inside a stainless steel body that resembles the original alinco design.

A rancher or dairy farmer feeds a magnet to each calf at branding time; the magnet settles in the rumen or reticulum and remains there for the life of the animal.

Cow magnet insertion procedure:

The magnet is administered after fasting the cow for 18–24 hours. This is most effective if done to the entire herd before the age of one.

The cow magnet attracts such objects and prevents them from becoming lodged in the animal’s tissue. While the resultant mass of iron remains in the cow’s rumen as a pseudobezoar (an intentionally introduced bezoar), it does not cause the severe problems of hardware disease.

Cow magnets are widely available from veterinary, feed supply, and scientific supply sources.